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The Right Fit

When you have diabetes, it’s important to pay attention to your feet. In addition to checking your feet on a regular basis for any problems, you should stick to a regular foot care routine, and also find the right shoes. Here are some points to keep in mind when selecting footwear.

Keep it comfortable. You may love the way a certain pair of shoes looks, but if they don’t feel right, you’re putting yourself at risk for blisters, cuts, or worse. Look for shoes that are both stylish and comfortable.

Stride right. If your shoes make you walk differently than you normally would, ditch them—it’s better than risking permanent damage to your feet.

Protect your feet. Sandals are fun when the weather warms, but make sure they properly support your feet and protect them from debris on the ground. If possible, limit how often you wear sandals, and make sure you inspect your feet after wearing them just to be on the safe side.

Skip the synthetics. If you have diabetes, you should avoid exposing your feet to extremely hot or cold temperatures. Some shoes made of synthetic materials such as plastic can make your feet very hot, so try swapping synthetic materials for cotton or leather if possible.

In addition, you should always talk with your diabetes healthcare team to determine if special health concerns warrant a specific type of shoe.

Page last updated: April 23, 2014