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Katie Weinger, Ed.D., R.N.,Ph.D., Appointed to the National Institutes of Health Behavioral Medicine, Interventions and Outcomes Study Section

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Many people picture researchers as spending the majority of their time in a lab conducting experiments, but this is not always the case – they also divide their time among teaching, mentoring, writing and reviewing responsibilities. These additional tasks are just as important as their work in the lab, which is why Katie Weinger, Ed.D., R.N.,Ph.D., Investigator in the Section of Clinical, Behavioral and Outcomes Research and an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, was happy to be appointed to the Behavioral Medicine, Interventions and Outcomes Study Section (BMIO) at the Center for Scientific Review, National Institute of Health (NIH).

The BMIO is composed of research experts who review grants for the NIH by scoring each grant application based on the quality, innovation and importance of the proposed study for the field of behavioral medicine. Each grant is reviewed by three experts who then come together to discuss and score the top 50 percent of grant applications. The grants that receive the best scores will most likely receive funding from the NIH. 

Dr. Weinger will serve as one of these experts for the next two to four years, and even though serving on the BMIO is a tremendous amount of work, this experience will serve as a great learning experience.

“You learn a lot [about] what other people are doing from your field and related fields,” said Dr. Weinger. “You also learn about the best way not to write a grant and what’s being favorably reviewed and what isn’t.”

As someone who has reaped the benefits of NIH funding in the past, Dr. Weinger feels compelled to serve on the BMIO. 

“Participating in study sections is something I feel we, as researchers, are obligated to do if we receive NIH funding,” explained Dr. Weinger. “We need to help review grants to make the system work. Similarly, we have to spend time reviewing papers in order to have high quality journals in which to publish our own papers.”

Dr. Weinger is aware, like many other Joslin researchers, of the fact that it is important for researchers to participate in this process to ensure that researchers from all fields can successfully secure funding for their studies.

Page last updated: October 23, 2014