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Friends, Dating and Diabetes

At some point, most kids and teens tell their friends that they have diabetes. If your friends do not know that you have diabetes, they will probably find out sooner or later.

You will probably need to check your blood sugar in front of them or maybe even take insulin. Also, you may want to tell your friends some of the signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar and what they can do to help if you are having a low blood sugar.

Some teens start by just telling a few close friends, but tell them about your diabetes in your own way and when you are ready.

Eventually, most teens tell the person they are dating that they have diabetes. Here's what one teen posted on the Joslin Discussion Boards:

"Everyone hesitates in telling others they have diabetes at one time or another. But you shouldn't let diabetes stop you from doing anything. You have diabetes, but you're also a normal teenager. If you are going to tell your girlfriend, start by saying something like "I want to let you know that..." and tell her that you're healthy, you're on medication, there's no need for her to worry about getting diabetes (we all know it's not contagious). But your girlfriend should know because if you are going to be with her, she should know some of the warning signs in case you go low. Tell your girlfriend just like you told your friends, and your relatives. If she's going to be a part of your life, she should know about diabetes, because diabetes is a big part of your life."

To see what other teens are writing on the Joslin Discussion Boards you can follow this link.

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Page last updated: November 26, 2014