close up of a lancet pen and child's finger

Train with the Best

School-age children spend nearly half of their waking hours in school. If they have diabetes, they need support in school to ensure their safety.

That’s why it’s so important for school nurses to be up-to-date with current treatment plans for diabetes and the type of issues that affect school-age children. In addition, all students with diabetes must have a written, individualized Diabetes Health Care Plan that meets the requirements of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

With this plan, it is necessary for school nurses to understand some of the issues children with diabetes face, including the monitoring blood glucose, dealing with hypoglycemia, the role of food and activity, field trip preparation, and more. At Joslin Diabetes Center, we offer classes designed to train school nurses in the management of diabetes - so they're fully prepared at work.

Diabetes Education Program for School Nurses

This one-day program, designed by the pediatric staff at Joslin Diabetes Center provides school nurses with up-to-date diabetes information in order to create a safe learning environment. Upon completion of the program, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the etiology and pathophysiology of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in youth.
  • Identify current treatment plans and tools utilized in the management of diabetes in children and adolescents and apply them to the school setting.
  • Review the role food and nutrition play in the management of diabetes.
  • Describe factors influencing and methods to maintain blood glucose control during exercise and physical activity for youth with diabetes.

Contact Hours
This continuing nursing education activity is approved by the American Nurses Association Massachusetts (ANA MASS), an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation to award 6.5 contact hours.

No partial credit will be awarded.
In order to receive contact hours, attendees must sign in and stay for the entire program.

Breakout Sessions - Participants will choose three sessions to attend.

  1. Food at School: School Lunches, Parties, and Special Treats 
    Portion sizes 
    Carbohydrate counting challenge 
    School lunches: “brown bag”, school lunch 
    Parties and special events: food, planning, diabetes management
     
  2. School Planning 101: Diabetes Management Plans, 504s, and IEPs 
    Goals of school plans 
    Types of plans: DMMP, 504, IEP 
    Student examples 
    Resources
     
  3. Insulin Pumps, Meters, and Other Technologies 
    Advantages and disadvantages 
    Goals of pump therapy 
    Types of insulin pumps 
    Calculating insulin doses 
    School nurse responsibilities 
    Note: Does not offer hands-on practice with pumps
     
  4. Beyond Medical Management: Psychosocial Challenges in Youth with Diabetes 
    Challenges for youth with diabetes: diabetes burnout, peer issues, school issues 
    Strategies for dealing with challenges 
    Case studies
     
  5. Two Perspectives: Q&A with a Diabetes Educator and a Parent of a Child with Diabetes 
    Parental concerns 
    Staff needs and concerns 
    Roles of non-medical school personnel
     
  6. Common Dilemmas and Solutions in Diabetes 
    Causes of poor glycemic control 
    - Falsification of blood glucose data 
    - Insulin omission 
    - Diabetes burnout (medical perspective)
    - Family stressors 
    Problem solving 
    Parental concerns 
    Staff needs and concerns 
    Roles of non-medical school personnel

The School Nurse Pump Education Program is a full day program designed by the pediatric staff at the Joslin Diabetes Center. The program provides school nurses with a greater understanding of the management of school-age children and adolescents wearing insulin pumps.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe pump therapy as a method of insulin delivery
  • Identify advantages and disadvantages of insulin pump therapy
  • Describe the use of insulin pump therapy in the school setting
  • Explain the calculation of insulin doses
  • Discuss common issues with pump therapy that arise in the school setting
  • Identify new glucose monitoring technology
  • List the characteristics associated with successful pump therapy in pediatric patients 

Contact Hours
This continuing nursing education activity is approved by the American Nurses Association Massachusetts (ANA MASS), an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation to award 6.25 contact hours.

No partial credit will be awarded
.

In order to receive contact hours, attendees must sign in and stay for the entire program.

All attendees will go to the following four breakout sessions:

  1. Pump Basics
    Objective: Define common terminology of insulin pump therapy. Identify the name of insulin pump parts and accessories.
  2. Does Insulin Pump Therapy Improve Clinical Outcomes?
    Objective: Identify potential clinical outcomes in insulin pump therapy.
  3. Advanced Insulin Pump Strategies
    Objective: Identify advanced pump features used to improve glycemic control.
  4. Managing Exercise on an Insulin Pump
    Objective: Describe the management of physical activity with insulin pump therapy.

Download the Application to register for the Joslin School Nurse Pump Education Program on Saturday, November 16.
Questions? SNP-CC [at] joslin.harvard.edu (Email) or call 617-309-4530.